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Linux Cheat Sheet
Have a look at our Linux Cheat Sheet for quick one-liners, commands and tips.
Quick Tip
Disable Overlay Scrollbars in GNOME
gsettings set com.canonical.desktop.interface scrollbar-mode normal
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Find Files Containing a Text Pattern
find . -iname "*.txt" -exec grep -l "hello" {} +
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In this article I’m going to share some of the Bash aliases and functions that I use and I find pretty handy every once in a while. Aliases are composed of a word which is assigned some longer command, so whenever you type that word, it will be replaced with the longer command. Functions are usually used for anything that it is longer and not fit for an alias, and they usually perform more complicated tasks and can handle parameters as well. Here is a good explanation of both aliases and functions and how to use them. And here is a short tutorial that I wrote a while ago regarding aliases.

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Although the CHM format is not used anymore very much, and even less on Linux, there are still documents and help files which may need a dedicated application for opening these files. Kchmviewer is one of them, and it has recently been updated to version 7.1.

kchmviewer01

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LXQt is designed to be the next-gen LXDE environment, using the Qt 5 libraries. LXQt is still under development, but a PPA is provided so you can try it in Ubuntu.

lxqt01

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In this tutorial I’ll show you how to automatically fire up any program or command when KDE starts up. You can create your own launchers (desktop files) to be ran or even Bash scripts with commands to be executed.

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Controlling Amarok from a terminal may come in handy in various situations, and can also be a way of using scripts or aliases to give commands directly to Amarok, without having to even keep the window opened, instead leaving it running in the system tray.

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Docking various applications comes in handy especially when you want to have applications you’d like to run continuously without taking up taskbar space, but the application in question has no such option. Below are a few ways of accomplishing this; the tools provided here will dock any window into the system tray, and they have several useful command-line options to control the behavior of docked windows.

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I compiled a cheat sheet for Linux which includes general-purpose commands, one-liners, Bash tips and system calls. You can download it from here.

For suggestions of corrections, please leave a comment below.

Updated: v0.2.2 (Mar 28, 2014) – added several C functions, DPKG tips

This tutorial focuses on showing the use of one of the new features introduced in Ubuntu 13.10, namely Smart Scopes. With Mir being postponed, Saucy Salamander didn’t have a lot of new features, focusing on stability rather than trying to break new grounds. Smart Scopes is one of the main additions to Dash in Saucy.

gnome-terminal

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By default, the Konqueror file manager will open various file types (including text files or images) in the integrated viewer, in the same tab from which you opened the respective file. To prevent it from doing this, just follow the next steps:

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There is this KDE bug which will open by default any movie application with Kaffeine, even though another program is set to open these. One solution would be to completely remove Kaffeine, this way the next application in the default applications list will be used.

However, if you don’t want to remove Kaffeine, you can try the following steps:

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Issue the following command in a terminal:

sudo dd if=/path/to/image.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=1024k

if is the input file, in this case the ISO image, and of is the output device. Replace /dev/sdX with the letter corresponding to your USB device (e.g. /dev/sdb).

In this tutorial I’ll show how to get some nicely colored man pages by adding several lines inside the .bashrc file, explaining what the code means and how it works.

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GNU find is a powerful command-line utility that lets you search for files and folders in a hierarchical tree directory structure. It is the backend for all those utilities out there like the graphical searching in KDE or GNOME. However, find can be a little hard to handle at first by beginners. In this tutorial I will try to explain some of the capabilities of find, show some useful one-liners and provide more explanations regarding this command.

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