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Linux Cheat Sheet
Have a look at our Linux Cheat Sheet for quick one-liners, commands and tips.

Parameter expansion is a powerful feature of Bash which will allow you to work on strings with great ease and just a little typing. Here are 10 simple examples on how to use just a bit of the power of parameter expansion to quickly modify and work on strings.

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In this article I’m going to share some of the Bash aliases and functions that I use and I find pretty handy every once in a while. Aliases are composed of a word which is assigned some longer command, so whenever you type that word, it will be replaced with the longer command. Functions are usually used for anything that it is longer and not fit for an alias, and they usually perform more complicated tasks and can handle parameters as well. Here is a good explanation of both aliases and functions and how to use them. And here is a short tutorial that I wrote a while ago regarding aliases.

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In this tutorial I’ll show how to get some nicely colored man pages by adding several lines inside the .bashrc file, explaining what the code means and how it works.

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This is the second article in this series, and brings eight additional tips for working faster with the shell. Here is the first article of the series, containing 10 tips.

Create aliases for quick access to commands or one-liners

Aliases are handy custom commands which can be used to make shortcuts to various commands, scripts or one-liners. Aliases can be added in the ~/.bashrc file like this:

alias name='command'

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Using !!
This command is used to bring back and automatically execute the last command in history. It is the same as pressing C^P followed by Enter). Here’s an example:

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The first TuxArena PDF ebook “Introduction to Linux Command-Line for Beginners” is now available completely free as a Christmas gift! You can read it online here or download the PDF version.

The guide covers the following topics:

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